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Student Survey Results Discussed in Parent Forum

December 21, 2017 |

On December 4, 2017 Clinton Public Schools, the Clinton Police Department, and Partners in Community presented on Substance Use Trends and Prevention at the Morgan School.

The results from the 2016 and 2017 student substance use surveys were discussed by Kelley Edwards, and overall the news is very good. Click here for a copy of the handout. Due to a concerted partnership between PiC, parents, youth, the school system, the Clinton PD, and many other community stakeholders, we are seeing shifts downward in alcohol, marijuana and tobacco use by teens. Use rates are the lowest they have been since 2005, when the surveys were first administered to 7-12 graders.

These declines in use are attributed to intentionally changing the perception of harm of use of substances, an increasing sense of peer disapproval of use, and also the disapproval of use by parents. The 2014 survey had indicated that the use of marijuana was rising, mostly due to the students’ perception that use was safe. The state of CT had legalized use of marijuana for medical purposes, and had “decriminalized” possession, which most teens errantly understood to mean “possession is legal”. In 2015-16 the definition of decriminalization was clarified and PiC and REACT focused campaigns on educating students and parents that use of marijuana before one’s brain is developed fully can be very harmful. By increasing students’ awareness of harm of use and by bolstering peer support for non-use, the prevention campaigns resulted in decreasing numbers of students using marijuana.

One substance that did not decline in use, however, was nicotine in Vapes or E-Cigarettes. Morgan students report 16-29% of each class have used a vape within the last 30 days. Most students who vape report using the Juul with nicotine-infused flavored liquids. Others state that tobacco and marijuana are also used in the vapes. The Clinton Police and Kelley Edwards showed attendees slides of what the Juul looks like, and how students are actually charging them on their chrome books during class. The perception of harm of use of these products is very low at Morgan, with some students believing that they are just vaping water. REACT will be conducting an educational campaign about vapes in early 2018.

Additionally in the presentation, the Clinton Police discussed the prevalence of opioid use in the community, as well as powdered cocaine. Clinton is not immune to the epidemic that our entire country is facing with misuse and addiction to pain medication and heroin. The Chief cited that Clinton lost three residents in 2016 to fatal overdose, and so far in 2017 two residents passed away due to overdose. More than 40 calls for overdose were responded to by the police and emergency services in town, with residents lives saved by administration of Narcan. The police officers also noted that powdered cocaine is making a comeback in the area, and the concern is escalated by it being “Cut” with chemicals like fentanyl, which can be instantly fatal to the user.

The police also showed parents in attendance photos of edible marijuana items which are popular and able to be ordered online. One of the dangers of using edibles is that the serving size is often a very small portion of the whole. For example, a marijuana brownie might have a serving size of only 1/6 of the whole. Not many people would read the label, and wind up quite ill from eating too much marijuana. Accidental ingestion of high levels of marijuana via edibles is an issue seen at many emergency rooms.

Another trend frequently seen by police, and verified by Morgan students, is the consumption of “Drank”, or “Purp” or “Lean”. This is a combination of cough syrup, sprite and a jolly rancher candy. Students use this combination because it makes the drink very sweet, yet the codeine in the cough syrup creates the high.

In the photo above, the K9 officer, Sonny, demonstrates how he can “hit” on hidden drugs.

If you would like a paper copy of the survey results please contact Kelley Edwards at kedwards@clintonct.org or by calling 860-664-1142.

REACT’s Spring Spirit Night

May 13, 2013 |

The hallways of Morgan reberverated with music, laughter, hippity hops and “swimming” at a substance free party called Spirit Night, a long standing Morgan tradition.

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Asif John Hussaini – Lending a Helping Hand

March 31, 2015 |

 

Clinton has been very fortunate to have Asif John Hussaini as a resident and businessman for many years! John is known for his generosity and desire to give back to the community during the most trying of times. John is always a friendly face, a warm smile, and the most steady of optimism for the Clinton community. PiC thanks you, John, for being an a leader in making Clinton a great place to live and work!

Name: Asif John Hussaini
Title/Company/Business/Office held: Subway – Eat Fresh
How are you a partner in community? Clinton Red Cross Disaster Volunteer, Clinton Volunteer Fire Department, Economic Development Commission, Clinton Placemakers, Clinton Democratic Town Committee, Former Chamber of Commerce Board Member
Why do you feel it is important to get involved?
Community service is the most effective way to serve my fellow man and to give back for the abundance of opportunities from which I benefit.
What do you hope to contribute or accomplish?
To alleviate pain and suffering for people who have experienced a disaster. To promote Clinton businesses and to help attract more commercial development for a more prosperous place to live and to do business.
If Ben & Jerry’s named an ice cream after you, what would it be called?
HumaniHussaini- Scooped together it makes Rocky Road smoother.

john hussani

 

Therapy Dogs at Morgan Help Reduce Stress

February 1, 2017 |

Charlie, the English Setter

Kammy Kupcake and Jenna

dogs1

This school year on the first Wednesday of every month, teams of therapy dogs and their handlers from Connecticut’s Pet Partners visit Morgan during the X-block period. The dogs come in and are available throughout the upper hub, the lower hub, and in the faculty lounge for students to sit with, pet, and just generally spend time around during their open period. The canine program is being offered to students this year in response to student focus group feedback indicating that stress levels are very high at Morgan. Research studies indicate that interactions with therapy animals can decrease stress in humans. “Playing with or petting an animal can increase levels of the stress-reducing hormone oxytocin and decrease production of the stress hormone cortisol.” claims Animal Smart , a website offering science-based information about animals to kids. A research study published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information finds that “just being in the presence of a companion animal, is associated with health benefits, including improvements in mental, social, and physiologic health status”.

All Pet Partners teams are insured, and risk management is very high, as Pet Partners requires the highest of standards from their teams. Pet Partners licenses the teams of dogs and handlers, requiring examinations, testing and recertification for the animals and the handlers every two years. It is an extremely safe program and best of all- is offered for no cost at all to the students. The handlers volunteer their time to be with the students, a genuine gift that benefits all parties!

Roxy

Some examples of the dogs visiting include: an English Setter named Charlie, a German Shepard named Vago, a Rottweiler mix named Roxy, a Golden Retriever named Ares, a small Japanese Shih Tzu named Cocoa, an Australian Shepard named Gus, and numerous others!

Feedback from the students has been very positive about the visits. Some students really look forward to the first Wednesday of the month, knowing that their school day will include some dog time. From an informal survey taken in December 2016, PiC found that 36 of 36 students questioned felt that the dogs were a good idea to have at school. 33 out of 36 respondents stated that they experienced decreased stress from interacting with or viewing the dogs (29 reported that they had actually pet or interacted with the dogs personally). Some personal comments included: Cool Idea
Keep the dogs! They are great. I wish they came more often.
This is a good program to have.
Be wary of people with allergies, but it is a wonderful thing to have the dogs visit.
Bring the dogs all the time.
I would like them here every week!

Another informal survey done by the Morgan Paw Print staff found that “35 of the 40 students interviewed said that the dogs benefitted the students and that bringing them here is a great idea. 4 of the students interviewed were unsure, and only 1 of the interviewed students out of the 40 believed that the dogs were not a good idea, [citing reasons such as allergies].”

Ares

The canine program at Morgan serves as a reminder to students to make stress reduction a priority. Some students have shared that their peers make “having stress” into a competition sometimes, fighting for who has more to do, or who has more stress overall. They agree that it can lead to a very unhealthy environment! Pressures from self, parents, coaches, teachers, peers and college drive students to not sleep, over commit, and not make healthy choices, which leads to stress and ultimately physical and/or mental illness. From surveys completed recently by PiC, we have seen that depression and even suicidal ideation are factors in roughly 1 out of 5 Morgan students; substance use in response to stress (self medication) occurs in roughly 1 in 4 Morgan students. The need to develop smart, healthy stress reduction techniques is essential!

Vago

PiC is also planning individual workshops on stress during X block in the next couple of months. Students will be able to learn about their own stress responses, outline sensible plans for combatting stress, and even create small stress reducing accessories that they can use during the school day.

cocoa1